“Ideas cause Ideas”

“Ideas cause ideas and help evolve new ideas. They interact with each other and with other mental forces in the same brain, in neighboring brains, and thanks to global communication, in far distant, foreign brains.” ~ Roger Sperry

Just as clinging to a single idea can be dangerous, having many can be a really good thing. It’s not great because you have many ideas, but because those many ideas are not isolated and can improve the others. This is true in your own head and when you’re brainstorming with others. A lot of people tend to cling to ideas as their property and are afraid of losing them, but sharing could be the very best thing.

9 Beliefs of Remarkably Successful People

Reblogged from inc.com by Jeff Haden

I’m fortunate enough to know a few remarkably successful people. Regardless of industry or profession, they all share the same perspectives and beliefs.

And they act on those beliefs:

1. Time doesn’t fill me. I fill time.

Deadlines and time frames establish parameters, but typically not in a good way. The average person who is given two weeks to complete a task will instinctively adjust his effort so it actually takes two weeks.

Forget deadlines, at least as a way to manage your activity. Tasks should only take as long as they need to take. Do everything as quickly and effectively as you can. Then use your “free” time to get other things done just as quickly and effectively.

Average people allow time to impose its will on them; remarkable people impose their will on their time.

2. The people around me are the people I chose.

Some of your employees drive you nuts. Some of your customers are obnoxious. Some of your friends are selfish, all-about-me jerks.

You chose them. If the people around you make you unhappy it’s not their fault. It’s your fault. They’re in your professional or personal life because you drew them to you–and you let them remain.

Think about the type of people you want to work with. Think about the types of customers you would enjoy serving. Think about the friends you want to have.

Then change what you do so you can start attracting those people. Hardworking people want to work with hardworking people. Kind people like to associate with kind people. Remarkable employees want to work for remarkable bosses.

Successful people are naturally drawn to successful people.

3. I have never paid my dues.

Dues aren’t paid, past tense. Dues get paid, each and every day. The only real measure of your value is the tangible contribution you make on a daily basis.

No matter what you’ve done or accomplished in the past, you’re never too good to roll up your sleeves, get dirty, and do the grunt work. No job is ever too menial, no task ever too unskilled or boring.

Remarkably successful people never feel entitled–except to the fruits of their labor.

4. Experience is irrelevant. Accomplishments are everything.

You have “10 years in the Web design business.” Whoopee. I don’t care how long you’ve been doing what you do. Years of service indicate nothing; you could be the worst 10-year programmer in the world.

I care about what you’ve done: how many sites you’ve created, how many back-end systems you’ve installed, how many customer-specific applications you’ve developed (and what kind)… all that matters is what you’ve done.

Successful people don’t need to describe themselves using hyperbolic adjectives like passionate, innovative, driven, etc. They can just describe, hopefully in a humble way, what they’ve done.

5. Failure is something I accomplish; it doesn’t just happen to me.

Ask people why they have been successful. Their answers will be filled with personal pronouns: I, me, and the sometimes too occasional we.

Ask them why they failed. Most will revert to childhood and instinctively distance themselves, like the kid who says, “My toy got broken…” instead of, “I broke my toy.”

They’ll say the economy tanked. They’ll say the market wasn’t ready. They’ll say their suppliers couldn’t keep up.

They’ll say it was someone or something else.

And by distancing themselves, they don’t learn from their failures.

Occasionally something completely outside your control will cause you to fail. Most of the time, though, it’s you. And that’s okay. Every successful person has failed. Numerous times. Most of them have failed a lot more often than you. That’s why they’re successful now.

Embrace every failure: Own it, learn from it, and take full responsibility for making sure that next time, things will turn out differently.

6. Volunteers always win.

Whenever you raise your hand you wind up being asked to do more.

That’s great. Doing more is an opportunity: to learn, to impress, to gain skills, to build new relationships–to do something more than you would otherwise been able to do.

Success is based on action. The more you volunteer, the more you get to act. Successful people step forward to create opportunities.

Remarkably successful people sprint forward.

7. As long as I’m paid well, it’s all good.

Specialization is good. Focus is good. Finding a niche is good.

Generating revenue is great.

Anything a customer will pay you a reasonable price to do–as long as it isn’t unethical, immoral, or illegal–is something you should do. Your customers want you to deliver outside your normal territory? If they’ll pay you for it, fine. They want you to add services you don’t normally include? If they’ll pay you for it, fine. The customer wants you to perform some relatively manual labor and you’re a high-tech shop? Shut up, roll ’em up, do the work, and get paid.

Only do what you want to do and you might build an okay business. Be willing to do what customers want you to do and you can build a successful business.

Be willing to do even more and you can build a remarkable business.

And speaking of customers…

8. People who pay me always have the right to tell me what to do.

Get over your cocky, pretentious, I-must-be-free-to-express-my-individuality self. Be that way on your own time.

The people who pay you, whether customers or employers, earn the right to dictate what you do and how you do it–sometimes down to the last detail.

Instead of complaining, work to align what you like to do with what the people who pay you want you to do.

Then you turn issues like control and micro-management into non-issues.

9. The extra mile is a vast, unpopulated wasteland.

Everyone says they go the extra mile. Almost no one actually does. Most people who go there think, “Wait… no one else is here… why am I doing this?” and leave, never to return.

That’s why the extra mile is such a lonely place.

That’s also why the extra mile is a place filled with opportunities.

Be early. Stay late. Make the extra phone call. Send the extra email. Do the extra research. Help a customer unload or unpack a shipment. Don’t wait to be asked; offer. Don’t just tell employees what to do–show them what to do and work beside them.

Every time you do something, think of one extra thing you can do–especially if other people aren’t doing that one thing. Sure, it’s hard.

But that’s what will make you different.

And over time, that’s what will make you incredibly successful.

Staying Positive

Even the best jobs can get you down and make you depressed sometimes. The fastest way to snap out of it isn’t to rage quit, its put things into perspective and elevate your mood.

It doesn’t matter if you’re working your dream job, there will be days when every exchange will make you feel bad about yourself. Suite 101 suggests the key is to remember that even if you feel overworked and under-appreciated, at least you have a job. It can be rough, but at least you’re being paid for your trouble.

That can be easier said than done, especially on bad days, so remember to keep work and life in balance and get out of the office when you can. Leave on time, or find an activity outside of the office that’s rewarding but forces you to leave at a regular time.

Most importantly, keep in mind that your job isn’t your life. Even if you love your job, it’s still called work for a reason, and the workday will eventually be over. What are some of your tips for staying positive even when your job gets you down? Do you just walk out, or try to cope? Share your tips in the comments.

Browse Facebook at Work Without Getting Compromised.

Web site HardlyWork.in lets you check your Facebook Newsfeed at work without the worry of prying eyes with a clever interface that poses as an Excel spreadsheet.

Now you can get away with cruising around Facebook at work, even when your boss is peering over your shoulder. Well, as long as the boss doesn’t look too closely.

Even the laziest slacker can look busy in a jiffy with this interactive adaptation of many of Facebook’s functions. Simply go to HardlyWork.in, click “Gimme Dem Spreadsheets,” enter your Facebook credentials, and there’s your Facebook newsfeed, all done up to look exactly like an Excel spreadsheet.

It’s not just a static graphic, either — HardlyWork.in lets you search for Facebook friends by entering names into the formula bar, load more items, check your newsfeed, wall, or tag photos, hover to see who liked a post, and there’s even a boss switch (the spacebar) that immediately changes everything into a vast sea of spreadsheet numbers all nestled within their legitimate-looking cells.

Just go to the site and give it access to your Facebook account, it populates a pedestrian-looking spreadsheet with your Facebook newsfeed. No eye-catching logos, sound effects, or chat windows will mar your appearance of diligent productivity. You will be able to browse your photo albums, so be careful as pictures can be eye-catching to that work busybody that always seems to be walking by your cubicle.

You can hover your mouse over comments and Likes, which give you more information and thumbnail previews when you do. You can even activate a “Bosskey” (the space bar) that acts as an emergency kill switch and will kick you immediately into a more real-looking spreadsheet should you need to look like you’re doing legitimate work in a hurry.

These sort of tools are always a little silly—for example, the HardlyWork.in window uses a Windows XP style, so hopefully that’s what you’re using at work. Unproductive work maybe more sinister than goofing off, maybe its not all that bad.

Building rapport is just not enough anymore.

Recently read another thread on a Social Networking Group that was touting how sales reps should “build rapport” with prospects in order to close more business and I couldn’t disagree more with this concept. If you are struggling to make quota and are being told that you need to “build rapport” with your prospects, your focus is in the wrong area.

Let me share with you why that is…
Why Rapport Building Tactics Don’t Work (And What to Do Instead)

People may buy from people they “like” but they don’t buy from people who “pretend” to have something in common with them or use manipulative tactics for ulterior motives.

This isn’t the 1970’s (yes, I’m saying false “rapport building” is an outdated and flawed sales tactic from back in the day) Consumers are smarter today and can smell insincerity over the phone or in person. The mere act of trying to falsely build rapport crushes another valuable piece of the sales puzzle for closing business and that is: TRUST.

I wouldn’t want friends that pretended to be into the same interests that I have. I’m certainly not going to do business with someone who I deem insincere. And I’m betting neither will your prospects.
Rapport Should Come Naturally

If you really want to connect with your prospects, learn what your best prospects “look like” and once you’ve identified your targeted audience, continue to brand yourself as an industry expert in your field while helping them become better and more successful at what they are trying to accomplish.

When it’s time to engage with your prospect, continue to focus on how you may be able to help them get what they want and you just might end up making a friend in the process. Naturally.